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. this view of america's islamist enemy is unfortunate endemic in both u.s. political parties, much of the u.s. and western media, and perhaps most damaging, much of the academy, especially and most prestigious universities. it is in my judgment that this is almost entirely without substantiation. and it continues to be washington's working assumption, america will slowly but surely be defeated with a loss of prestige, plot, financial solvency, and domestic political cohesion. we will lose not because any of these threats are stronger than we are. that certainly is not the case. america's myopic indeed can america's myopic coming elite and its media acolytes have taken enemies who are each in military capability, at most the puny five-foot tall, even sandals, and made them into 10-foot tall and still growing behemoths. the three threats i'm going to speak about are those posed by iran, saudi arabia and al qaeda and its allies. taking these three threats, each of which is based in the persian gulf, let us first look at the smallest least threatening threat, that which comes from iran. since our
will the u.s. play? and did the u.n. vote dom lay to stop gadhafi? will he accept some kind of deal? we'll try to answer those questions. also, japanese authorities have raised the assessment of the disaster to a five, three mile island level on a seven-point scale and now admit they're overwhelmed employing a throw it against the wall and see what sticks approach. the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission says it could take weeks to get things under control. >>> score one for the unions in wisconsin. a judge has temporarily blocked that new law blocking collective bargaining rights in that state. democrats hope this is the first of many obstacles to that law they hate. we'll check it out. >>> let me finish with libya. do we have any idea how we'll get out. we start with the growing crisis in libya. richard engel joins us from cairo. give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the condition of the rebel force, entirely benghazi? >> reporter: the rebel force is very weak in benghazi and across the country. what happened was the rebels advanced
urgeent. u.s. and allied forces firing on libya igniting the biggest international military effort since the iraq war. this is a special edition of the fox report. new images showing u.s. navy ships firing missiles at qaddafi air defenses and teeping up with britain,itiny and canada all to support a rebel uprising in that country. it appears on the verge of defeat. secretary of state hillary clinton said left unchecked qaddafi will commit unspeakable atrocities . the first shots coming from french fighter jets. a plane shot down over the outskirts of benghazi bursting in flames . crashed and sending thick black smoke in the sky. rebels, cheering and celebrating as international forces move in tryying to protect them. so far 112 cruz missiles launched near tripoli. we have fox news team coverage on the ground . mike emanuel is traveling with the president in brazil and steve first in tripoli. steve, any reaction from qaddafi to the air trikes? >>reporter: john, what we heard from qaddafi in the past several days. one of defiance and he said he will retaliate against military or civilian t
>>> this is a fox news alert. we are tracking the action in libya, we're told the u.s. will launch missile strikes against libyan air defenses within the hour. french jets launching air strikes on libyan tanks and now nato members preparing jets to head to libya to protect citizens of the north african country. they are wrapping up an emergency meeting in paris a short time ago as french warplanes circle the skies enforce the no-fly zone. hello, welcome to a brand-new hour. >> jamie: i'm jamie colby. the situation in libya is quickly developing as nato counties shift military resources to the region. molly henneberg is tracking that and live in the d.c. bureau. molly, good to see you. secretary clinton it's so unusual to hear from how severe things they are. should she did have a couple diplomatic points she wanted to make very clear clear. tell us about those. >> molly: that the u.s. backed international efforts to prevent libyan leader from muammar khadafy from attacking his own people but the u.s. would be taking a supportive role in any operation. >> we did not lead this. we di
-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> u.s. missiles light the mediterranean sky and operation "odyssey dawn" is now under way. a coalition of western arab states launched the first strikes on libya. >>> french warplanes lead the assault. the allies' goal to stop moammar gadhafi from butchering his own people to stay in power. >> at this hour, some of the besieged towns including in benghazi in ruins but it's still in the hands of rebels. benghazi is right now, after days of pleading for help, they're finally getting it. the international community is responding right now with decisive effects. we want to welcome our viewers to this special edition of "the situation room." i'm wolf blitzer in washington. >> and i'm jonathan mann in atlanta. we welcome you to our continuing coverage of "target libya." it's been an extraordinary 48 hours. thursday afternoon, we saw the u.n. security council authorize the establishment of a no-fly zone over libya. and in just the last few hours, we have seen the first flights to bring that to the air. now, eight years to the day after u.s. militar
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
military targets overnight. a spokesman suggests u.s. combat operations may have peaked. the u.s. role is in the no-fly zone. it's moving from action to patrolling phase today. libyan handlers took journalists to see damage inside gadhafi's compound. that happened earlier today. a possible missile wrecked a four-story building. gadhafi was not the target. >>> defense secretary robert gates arrived in russia today as that country's prime minister turned up the heat. putin ripped the united states for what he called a steady trend of intervention abroad. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition and be a member of the coalition and have a military role in the coalition. >> arab league president is toning down his criticism of the coalition attacks. he met with u.n. secretary moon in cairo today saying he's committed to the u.n. resolution on libya. yesterday, he complained the campaign was too broad and civilians were killed. >>> libya freed four new york times journalists today. the four cro
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
, if you are just waking up. fresh word from the nation's top military officer after u.s. and coalition forces bombarded libya's defenses overnight. admiral mike mullen tells nbc news there is a no-fly zone in place in libya. that's after more than 110 tomahawk cruise missiles from warships and submarines slammed the antiaircraft units and command posts. admiral mullen also said that possible outcome of the military action could include the embattled leader, moammar gadhafi, remaining in power. meanwhile, gadhafi issued an audio address on state tv, saying the country was preparing for a long war. on the screen, the image of a giant, gold fist crushing an american plane. nbc's jim maceda's in libya's capital of tripoli. jim, with another good day to you, we have cruise missiles that were targeting sites around the city there. what's it like there now? >> reporter: here, it's quiet. it wasn't so at 2:30, 3:00 in the morning, though, alex. we all jumped and jolted first when we heard a number of explosions. it was these deep thuds that you never like to hear. they could have been cruise m
u.s. destroyers in the mediterranean and three u.s. sub marines and one british sub marine. they were fired off of those at 2:00 p.m. eastern time. takes about an hour flying time for the tomahawks to strike their targets. there were about 20 targets evenly divided between the capital of tripoli as well as misred aed ta where we he do understand from reports on the ground that an air force academy was targeted there as well as the main air base that qadaffi has. also, two strikes against sert, the hometown of qadaffi but none against benghazi where the rebels are holed up. they wanted to avoid any casualties in benghazi. >> judge jeanine: that, of course, being the rebel stronghold. we are now six hours into the cruz missile attack. is it true that it will take in fact hours more for us to know the full extent of the cruz missile attacks? >> reporter: i think they are starting to get some reports. one u.s. defense official says that qadaffi's defense systems basically an sa 5 old soviet era defense system, ironically the same that was used by saddam hussein exactly 8 years
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
in the euro after it jumped to a four-month high against the u.s. dollar on thursday. now coming away from that a little bit, but obviously underlying that, underpinning the euro was the central bank president. slightly caught investors offguard when he said interest rates may rise as soon as next month. people had been betting in terms of june or may. the yen at 82.44 to the dollar. >>> investors across asia seem to be focusing pretty much what's going on in the u.s. we've got that better than expected jobs number out. it was a weekly jobs number which is providing a pretty strong indicator, at least that's how it's being seen for the u.s. economy. that rally overnight. and that helped the markets pretty much across the board here in asia. all four of the key markets up by more than 1.4%. there was a weaker yen against the u.s. dollar in japan, that helped the exporters. all in all, hong kong up 1.25%, shanghai 1.3%, and australia with a 1.2% gain. >>> well, if you thought that was impressive, let's have a look at the u.s. markets. and essentially what we're looking at is the best session
back over to candy crowley. >>> this morning u.s. and international forces have effectively put in place the no-fly zone in libya. that was preceded by a furious assault of tomahawk missiles from allied forces at sea. >> this is just the first phase of a multiphased military operation to enforce the united nations resolution and deny the regime to use force against its own people. >> the days of tough talk are over. today the attack on libya. the role of the u.s. military command commander, the latest from mike mule enof centcom commander admiral william fallon. >> what we really know from energy secretary stephen chu. i'm candy crowley. and this is "state of the union." moammar gadhafi's bases are getting pounded. he remains defiant. there was this broadcast message. >> they have to know we will fight. >> this land will not submit ever. we have defeated italy when it was great power like you today. you are aggressives. you are animals. >> let's go to senior international correspondent nic robertson. he is in tripoli. nic, what have you seen or heard of this first 24 hours reall
of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influencial voices on foreign policy, john mccain and joe lieberman. and healthcare reform one year later. we will ask our sunday group what is the long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now on "fox news sunday." and hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday. now, authorities worry about al-qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, bombing by u.s. and allied planes has paveed the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town. for more on libya let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. >> a rapid advance for the rebels. moving quickly toward what they say is an eventual battle here in tripoli. they have taken the key town of ajdabiya. the air strikes have ta
once the bombing stops. it's still u.s. policy for gadhafi to go. but that's not the mandate of the united nations mission. this hour, live reports, new information about the battle plan right now, and the president's end game. >>> and fright thing new set backs in japan's nuclear crisis. officials try to put to rest concerns of contaminated food. i'm wolf blitzer you're in "the situation room." >>> anti-aircraft fire over tripoli just a little while ago. one u.s. official tells us coalition attacks appear to have stalled moammar gadhafi and his forces. it's unclear what the libyan leader may be doing next or where he is even right now. gadhafi's compound took a pounding today. u.s. and allied commanders deny they're specifically targeting him or his residents. one u.s. commander acknowledged that gadhafi may still be in power when the bombing stops. president obama says the u.s. will try to push gadhafi out. but within the limits sanctioned by the united nations. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools to support that policy. when it come
the u.s. military is getting ready to take an extraordinary step evacuating troops from the island. >>> and i'm kiran chetry. no relief in sight for homeowners. new numbers showing how weak the housing market is. and even more troubling, analysts said we may not have hit bottom yet. "american morning" starts right now. >>> all right. it is tuesday, march 22nd. a lot of news this morning. again, it's been a wild couple of weeks. >> and it's well into the day in japan. already another two earthquakes today. we're well into the 600s in terms of aftershocks and tremors. more concerns there. >> we're going to bring everybody up to date on that. but first, we're going to start with libya. coalition forces hammering moammar gadhafi's forces and positions as the head of forces in libya said the coalition flew 80 missions yesterday more than half of them by countries other than the united states. also saying that the dictator's momentum has been stopped, at least for now. but in misrata, which is a key city two hours east of tripoli, people are saying that civilians are still being massacre
at the wreckage of a u.s. f-15 that crashed today in rebel-held eastern libya, for reasons the u.s. military says were mechanical, not hostile. i will say that again for you. the u.s. says the plane had equipment problems and was not shot down. the two-man crew jekted and the pilot was recovered quickly. the weapons officer was found by rebels and americans reached him. neither badly hurt. >>> back in tripoli, reporters saw the results of a missile landing on a port. >>> we also have remarkable pictures from misrata, a city down the coast that gadhafi forces have bombarded for days. this is amateur video uploaded to youtube yesterday. now, we can't confirm when or where it was shot, but we do know misrata's main hospital reports 77 deaths since sunday. the u.n.-approved campaign to protect libyan civilians began saturday and it's still not clear who will actually end up in charge. arab states don't want to work for nato and u.s. has other campaigns to worry about. nato says it will enforce a libyan arms embarge go the in meantime. let's bring in diana magnay, she's on the "uss keer sauj." nic rep
growing concern about the bombing of rebel-held areas by gaddafi's forces, there are voices in the u.s. and europe calling for the rebels to be armed to directly. it sounds simple, but history offers plenty of cautionary tales. in a moment, we will hear whether senator john mccain thinks it is a good idea. >> what i am calling for is a greater access for the libyan opposition forces for weaponry. >> there is no guarantee that by helping these people, you necessarily bring about a more democratic outcome or more desirable outcome. >> the question is, what kind of arms with a supply? whom would supply them? britain session -- britain's special forces may have suffered a setback last week in libya. but the momentum is still building in the west for military intervention of some kind, including perhaps arm the rebels. in libya, repeated bombing by government warplanes around the rebel-held oil town of ras lanuf marks colonel gaddafi's drive in his country. opposition forces are determined, but still lack a clear organization or command structure. the worst violence was reported near tripol
near me. i am greg gutfeld and i will see you soon. the u.s. and its allies continue attacks on government forces. the lawmakers here wonder what is the end game? this is as uprising spread to other nations raising bigger questions about the region. group of g.o.p. presidential hopefuls head to iowa. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm jim angele in for bret baier. african countries are calling for transition to lead to the democratic connections in libya. libyan government delegation is meeting in ethiopia with five african heads of state who want a roadmap for political reform there. political leaders don't have representative at the meeting. coalition forces continue to pound those loyal to gaddafi. the national correspondent jennifer griffin explains why cit exit is likely not in cards. >> good evening. on day seven of the operation over libya, command of the operation still in question and not likely to be settled before sunday at the earliest. >> a transition process that will take through the weekend, more allied pilots begone taking the l
living within 12 miles of the site to evacuate. those within 18 miles to stay indoors. the u.s. government says its residents within 50 miles should leave. >> we think it's a prudent measure to follow the evacuation based on how we would handle a situation like that in the united states. >> reporter: there are six reactors at the site. in unit 1 an explosion destroyed part of an outer building. in unit 2 there may have been an explosion rupturing the containment facility and possibly letting radioactive fuel escape. unit 3 was the target of today's water drops. it too had an explosion of the outer building and it also has exposed fuel rods. unit 4 was shut down for maintenance when the earthquake struck, but it became the subject of a controversy when the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission said its stored fuel rods were totally exposed. units 5 and 6, which are also out of service, may also have problems with their used fuel rods. experts say unit 3 is especially dangerous, because it has recycled fuel that contains plutonium, an even greater health threat than the
of circumstances and an entirely different mission which is not the u.s. military mission at this point. but clearly it is a political mission for the white house and many of the united states military diplomatic allies there in europe. >> jim, thanks. >> you bet. >> i want to talk more about that coalition. the military muscles has put moammar gadhafi air defenses. these attacks reach the door step, striking the administration building but the location is currently unknown. jim maceda has the latest from tripoli for us. have there been air strikes? >> no, there haven't been, thomas. we have some news, however, of this ongoing development in the third largest city. it is gadhafi forces which were hit by the air strikes, by the way, outside yesterday. today they are on the attack with reports that gadhafi troops now with tanks and snipers have entered the city and fired on people killing the latest figure is at least nine individuals. now this is extremely interesting because you've got troops who allegedly have changed out of their uniforms into street clothes looking like either armed
announcements about u.s. wars, about u.s. military interventions. some of them amounting to small wars, some amounting to very large wars. now that the united states has embarked on its latest new military intervention in libya, i would love to be able to show you the current president's oval office address on the subject, but there isn't one. president obama did make a public statement saturday afternoon that we had started that military intervention in libya, but did so from the confines of a convention center in brazil. eight years to the day that george w. bush stared unsteadily into the camera and announced the iraq invasion, president obama announced his own military intervention, but pointedly declined the opportunity to do it in a way that u.s. presidents usually do. president obama taking all sorts of criticism from the right over the past few days for not cancelling his trade visit to latin america as a result of this military action in libya. and the white house knew that criticism would come. their decision to go ahead with the trip anyway, to forego the chest thumping commander
republican candidate mike huckabee is confused about where the current president grew up. but first, the u.s. is closer to the crisis in libya. tonight two u.s. warships are heading for the waters off libya although for now he says it's not to fight. >> we'll be enter the mediterranean shortly. it will provide us a capability for both emergency evacuations. >> moammar gadhafi is trying as hard as he can to hold onto power. pro-gadhafi troops tried and failed to retake a town neurotripoli currently under rebel control. and one of gadhafi's sons tells cnn the government is trying to talk with the rebels, but the rebel leadership is in chaos. let's start with cnn's international correspondent, ben wedeman, who is in rebel-held city benghazi. the former libyan interior minister says the noose is tightening around gadhafi's neck. tell us where have you gone and what have you seen? >> we headed sort of in the direction of tripoli. what we've seen is that the noose isn't necessarily tightening around gadhafi's neck. it's clear the opposition is in firm control of this part of the country, but if yo
coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't reach the plant. however, having said that, the levels of radiation in tokyo have returned to normal. apparently the italian embassy found that levels of radiation were a fifth of what they were in r
. this is overnight videotape from the u.s. navy, a u.s. coalition launching two nights of punishing air attacks targeting mommar gadhafi's forces, b52 bombers, jet fighters, more than 120 tom hawk cruise missiles, scattering progovernment forces on the ground in libya, the long time leader vowing a long war ahead. good morning, everybody. we've got it all covered for you. what a way to start a weefnlgt i'm bill hemmer, welcome to "america's newsroom". good morning to you martha. martha: good morning, bill. i am martha maccallum. an international air assault, all but crippling libya's air defenses, that according to the u.s. military. listen to this: >> there has been no new air activity by the regime and we have de tented no radar emissions from the defense sites targeted and there has been a significant decrease in the use of all libyan air surveillance radar which is most of those appear to be limited now only to the areas around tripoli and surt. we are not ruling out strikes against valid targets when and if the need arises. martha: there you have it, u.s., british and french planes blastin
the american navy. u.s. president obama who was in brazil for trade discussions talked about the discussion to take military action. >> the u.s. of force is not our first choice. and it's not a choice i make lightly. but we cannot stand idly by when a tyrant tells his people there will be no mercy. >> to take a look now at this map. this gives you an idea of where coalition strikes were aimed. also the areas of the no fly zone. the main areas are interest are been goes benghazi and the heart of tripoli. moammar gadhafi addressed his people and the world, saying libya will wipe out the aggressors from the united states, britain and france. >> we will be victorious, achieve victory on behalf of the people. we have allah with us. you have the devil on your side. what right have you got to attack our people? who gave you that right? who are you? you backward barbaries. this is an aggression that has no justification. this atrocity. we will hold to our land, to our rights. we will fight inch by inch. this land has been stained with t the plod of our people, our leaders, our forefathers. >> now t
the next day and then you're not putting up any forces, you're criticizing the u.s. for foreign military intervention. so they want to make sure the arabs are along with them so then they can't be blamed later on. so that's -- >> finish your point there. >> so that's why we've been seeing secretary clinton really in the last week reaching out to those arab leaders saying, we need you with us. you say you're going to -- you say you support this, you say you want us to influence the no-fly zone, what are you going to do to stand with us to do this? this is really extraordinary. an arab league authorizing force against one of its members. as we've said, it's really a unique since the gulf war in 1991. >> unique in many ways, but no matter what, will there still be some elements in the arab world who will see this as still being operated, still being controlled behind the scenes at least in large part by western powers, appearing once again to be exerting some kind of military action in another arab country? >> well, we've seen -- that's why this is really unique. because nobody has
to rain down. aircraft like this u.s. marine corps harrier jet have flown more than 212 missions so far against the libyan forces. ships in the mediterranean has launched more than 160 tomahawk cruise missiles. in the daylight the damage is becoming clear. this is what is left of several large rocket launchers, trucks and also other military hardware in tripoli's port area. far to the east, a u.s. fighter plane crashed due to mechanical problems. that happened near the opposition strong hold of bengahzi. the two-man crew parachuted from the doomed aircraft. u.s. marines managed to extract crewmen, one was picked up by rebels and taken to a luxury hotel suite. he's back in american hands. two days after the coalition missile slammed into his tripoli compound, a defined moammar gadhafi has been addressing supporters. he urged muslims worldwide to join the battle against what he calls blatant aggression. >> translator: we will be victorious in this fight. we will not give up. they will not penalize us. we are making fun of their rockets. the libyans are laughing at these rockets. we will d
are considering other ways to help those suffering in libya. hillary clinton says the u.s. military might have a role to play, such as getting supplies to where they're needed. the u.s. secretary of state acknowledged direct intervention would face major opposition. the arab league says it's against any foreign interference. >>> now, some people taking part in the uprising against colonel gadhafi say they want western forces to give support, to prevent more attacks by government planes. some politicians in washington say the u.s. should do just that. but the defense secretary told congress it wouldn't be easy. >> if it's ordered, we can do it. but the really is, and people, there's a lot of, frankly, loose talk about some of these military options. and let's just call a spade a spade. a no-fly zone begins with an attack on libya. to destroy the air defenses. that's the way you'd do a no-fly zone. and then you can fly planes around the country and not worry about our guys being shot down. but that's the way it starts. >> i'm not endorsing it. >> no, i understand that. but it also requires more
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
>>> this sunday, the allied strike against libya stretches into its second week as the u.s. seeks to limit its role. >> responsibility for this operation is being transferred from the united states to our nato allies and partners. >> but as criticism from congress mounts, many questions remain. what happens if gadhafi clings to power? what are the limits of the u.s.'s role if a civil war gets worse? and how does a military campaign relate to our overall strategy in the mideast? this morning, a special joint interview, with us, the secretary of state hillary clinton and secretary of defense robert gates. >>> then -- the president faces critics from both sides of the aisle. did he overstep his constitutional authority by using force without consulting congress. my interview this morning with republican from indiana senator richard lugar. >>> finally, analysis of the administration's handling of the crisis in libya is our fragile economic recovery continues and our military is stretched thin by two other wars, did the president make the case to the american people that libya is worth
report. >> it's just the beginning. >> the u.s. and allies, now seeing the effects of a full scale military operation to stop libya's leader, muammar gaddafi. >> and effectively he hasn't flown any in the last few days, i would say the no-fly zone is effectively in place. >> harris: that was 24 hours ago, and tonight, fox reports live from tripoli. what our journalists on the ground are seeing now. plus, life saving supply already running low in japan's devastation zone. now traces of radiation found in even more food sources. but a month a frantic rush to contain a nuclear disaster. >> earthquake survivors pulled from the wreckage. we're live from japan where a new day begins. we begin tonight with a heavy bombardment by coalition forces inside libya. mixed messages by muammar gaddafi who has called for a new cease-fire and promises to fight to the death at the same time. here is where we stand. the fog calling operation odyssey dawn a success and we're told the no-fly zone is now in effect and cruise missiles and long range bombers have taken out a number of key targets including
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
of an amnesty, a dialogue, and an invitation to a u.s. fact-finding mission, even a chance for a free press. for his hard-core supporters, it was a family day out, and it did not matter what he said. the libyans to do not like things the way they are, who do not want civil war, might listen and wonder whether the risks of taking on the regime are worth it. the colonel's leadership style is eccentric, but he is hitting back hard and slowing the rebellion against his rule. that was something they could not do in egypt or tunisia. jeremy bowen, bbc news, tripoli. >> an international effort has begun to repatriate tens of thousands of foreigners, most of them egyptian, who have been massing on libya's border with tunisia. britain and france have sent several of their plans. the largest british warship is heading for libyan coastal waters. they have rescued 85,000 in the past week. we have this report from the border. >> the struggle for liberation in the arab world has led to this. men fighting for a seat on a bus, desperate to escape from libya, pleading to simply be allowed to go home. 85,000
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
. america and its allies now just hours away from control of the skies. so what's next for u.s. forces, and what will gadhafi do now? >>> radiation in food from japan. >> fukushima fresh vegetables. >> we do our own tests. >>> and an american family after ten days of hope learns their daughter was lost trying to save others. >>> men, women and jobs. which sex is getting 90% of the new jobs and why? >>> and sibling secrets. are you an older or younger sibling? news about which order gives you an edge in health and happiness. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight beginning this week together, the united states is still in the middle of an international assault on moammar gadhafi's libya. but the battle is moving at breakneck speed. it is called "operation odyssey dawn," and as of tonight, the skies are clear. gadhafi's forces have come to a halt though there are still big questions. how soon can the u.s. hand over the lead to other countries? who are these libyan rebels, and are we even on the same side? and what is next? will gadhafi fold, or could this go on for years? we hav
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
to be the targets here, but that there are ground force near the sites where the u.s. is targeting, that they could become casualties at this point. do you think, given what we do know about libya, this would be enough to motivate people to switch sides, to back off, to rethink their support of libya's strongman? >> as i said, it's really about momentum right now. if there's any sense the momentum is shifting against the gadhafi regime, we're likely to see additional defections. the only thing that reverses it is that gadhafi was still strong and he had a lot of tools as his disposal. it could happen. when you look at the u.n. resolution, everybody's been saying it's about civilians. but if you look at the text, it gives the international community and those carrying out the commission is it gives them tools. every target in libya is a legitimate target if it's tied to civilians. the mission is about defending civilians. you've already stated the u.s., the europeans, most of those who are part of the coalition really don't think they can live with gadhafi as president of libya. they see him has hav
will explain to those lawmakers and to the american people his take on the u.s. military involve in the the north african nation, which began just over a week ago. white house correspondent mike emanuel is at the national defense university, the site of the speech tonight with a preview. mike? >> reporter: good evening. president obama will speak to a mostly military audience in the auditorium about why he authorized military force in libya. and where the mission goes from here. military intervention by the u.s. and allies appeared to have shifted momentum in favor of the rebels who fought their way to muammar gaddafi's hometown of sirte. >> clearly, the opposition is not well-organized and it's not a very robust organization. that is obvious. so any gain that they make is tenuous based on that. >> reporter: in a town hall on univision simulcast in spanish, president obama reiterated about libya. >> our involvement is there is going to be limited. both in time and in scope. >> reporter: over the weekend, mr. obama explained why he believed military action was necessary. >> i firm
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